Pakira Walters Eriha

Ingoa whānau
Eriha
Ingoa tuatahi
Pakira Walters

World War 2

Tau Rangatū
39009
Tūnga
Private
Address on enlistment
Care of D. Finlayson, Private Bag, Otorohanga, New Zealand
Whanaunga tino tata i te wā o te kuhunga
Mrs E. Walters (mother), Te Kao, New Zealand

Comments (3)

There is memories of this solider, held in the hearts of his whānau. He was a great man to us, a solider of New Zealand and will always be in our memories! Love you always Pa...... x x x x x

This man not only served our country but served his faith when he returned from war. For me he will always be in my heart and in my memories for all the loving things he said and did. My fondest memory was helping my grandfather on saturday mornings preparing the church for sunday service at Holy Sep in Newmarket, Auckland. My older brother and i would help our grandfather then sit down on the front steps of this huge church and have KFC for lunch. Pa you will always be in our hearts , Love you always Aaron xxxxx.

My name is Iwa Hokimate Williams (nee Kapa). Pakira Eriha was my step dad.To me he was my DAD in every sense of the word. He and my mother Ihapera Eriha (nee Kapa) married when I was 8 years old and right up to the day he died he always treated me with an abundance of kindness, love and respect. I loved him, and miss him dearly. I married James Michael Pakinga Williams and we have 4 children, Colin, Aaron, MALEME, and Lyall. Yes, I have highlighted our daughters’ name, as she was named by him. When my grandmother told him and my mother I was going to give birth to a girl, he caught a taxi from Mt Wellington to the North Shore where we lived, kept the taxi waiting, came inside the house and said "I have just been speaking to Mama and she tells me you are having a girl, CAN I NAME HER"?. I asked him what name he would like. He said "Alamein". I turned to him and said "But you never served in “Alamein”, he said "I know, but I like the name". I said "Yes, OK Dad, I like it too", and off he went back home on his waiting taxi. When our daughter was born he came to the hospital (on a taxi), he comes over to me, gives me a kiss, and says "Where is she"??. I said "I'm fine, thanks for asking". He says "Sorry, kei hia toku mokopuna”, and off he went to harass the nurses. We (Mum, Jim, our 2 little boys and I) followed him as he banged on the nursery window, demanding to see his MOKOPUNA – the good looking one. As the nurses pushed her bassinet over to the window he whispers –KIA ORA MALEME.